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Last update: 2022-05-28T16:15:00-05:00
CO2
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PM
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Formaldehyde
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VOC
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Temperature
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Humidity
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CO2
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PM
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Formaldehyde
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VOC
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Temperature
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Humidity
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Parameter information

Particulate Matter (PM)
GOOD
0 to 25 µg/m³
MODERATE
25 to 55 µg/m³
POOR
Over 55 µg/m³
One of the most dangerous aspects of particulate matter is that it acts as the vehicle for viruses and bacteria. These particles are invisible to the naked eye, but can linger in the air for extended periods of time and travel on air currents. These particles can be released into the air by coughs, sneezes, and even just by talking. Dust, fungi, bacteria, pollen, and diesel exhaust are other common examples of particulate matter. These can also decrease overall health, cause sickness, and aggravate allergy symptoms.
Carbon Dioxide (CO₂)
GOOD
400 to 850ppm
MODERATE
850 to 1100ppm
POOR
Over 1100ppm
As more people occupy a space, more carbon dioxide will fill the indoor environment. High carbon dioxide levels increase the likelihood of drowsiness, distraction, lethargy, and affect productivity, concentration, and work performance. Carbon Dioxide is also a direct reflection of how much fresh air/ventilation is being pushed into a room at any given time. If ventilation is poor, airborne hazards can spread throughout a room over a longer time span. Virus infection rates correlate directly with carbon dioxide levels; as carbon dioxide increases, so does the rate of infection.
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
GOOD
0 to 3 ppm
MODERATE
3 to 6 ppm
POOR
Over 6 ppm
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are hazardous chemicals that are released into the air by everyday things. Being volatile, means these chemicals evaporate easily and release into the air where they can remain long after the source is removed from the space. Many VOCs are cancer-causing and can lead to other health concerns if someone is exposed to them for an extended period of time. As a result of viruses such as the seasonal flu and COVID-19, many people have increased their sanitization efforts, but many of these chemical cleaners release harmful VOCs into the air. This means that as they eliminate one hazard, they may be introducing another. There are hundreds of VOCs recognized by the EPA. The source of VOCs can be traced back to everyday things such as cleaners/disinfectants, building materials, air fresheners, personal care products, furniture, glues, tobacco smoke, wood burning stoves, and printers/copiers, just to name a few. Some health effects caused by VOCs are eye/nose/throat irritation, headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, loss of coordination, cancer, and damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system.
Formaldehyde (CH₂O)
GOOD
0.00 to 0.05 mg/m³
MODERATE
0.05 to 0.12 mg/m³
POOR
Over 0.12 mg/m³
Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring volatile organic compound (VOC), commonly emitted by painted surfaces, fabrics, carpets, adhesives, glues, and building materials like pressed wood & particle board. It can also be released from other, less expected sources like hand sanitizers and cleaners. Like other VOCs, formaldehyde evaporates easily and releases into the air where it can remain long after the source is removed from the space. Low levels of formaldehyde exposure can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation and effects in the nasal cavity. High levels of formaldehyde exposure can cause coughing, wheezing, chest pains, and bronchitis. Studies have even shown that chronic exposure can potentially increase the possibility of lung and nasopharyngeal cancer.
Humidity
GOOD
45 to 60 %
MODERATE
30 - 45 and 60 - 65 %
POOR
Over 65 or Under 30 %
Low humidity can increase infection rates by negatively affecting your body’s ability to filter airborne pathogens. Studies have also shown that low humidity helps viruses thrive and remain in the air for longer periods of time. In low humidity, infectious particles are aerosolized much quicker due to the drier environment, and in turn travel further and infect more people. High humidity can decrease the viability of viruses, both airborne and on surfaces, but it can introduce new problems into the environment. High humidity can create damp indoor spaces that support mold growth. Mold releases spores that can be harmful to occupant health triggering asthma, respiratory symptoms, and eye/nose/throat irritation.
Temperature
GOOD
68 to 74 °F
MODERATE
55 - 68 and 74 - 83 °F
POOR
Over 83 or Under 55 °F
Optimal temperature conditions range between 68°F and 74°F. Low temperatures can result in higher levels of virus transmission and drier conditions. High temperatures can result in mental fatigue causing diminished reaction times and delayed information processing. The release of VOCs into the air is also accelerated in higher temperatures, due to the warm air increasing the speed of evaporation
Last update: 2022-05-28T16:15:00-05:00
Billy Penn Studios

Blue Certificate AB011251

1516 N 5th St Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
Blue Certificate (AB011251)
  • Did you know?

    Studies have shown that low humidity levels can support airborne viruses, increasing infection rates.
  • Did you know?

    Carbon Dioxide (CO₂) levels can be a direct inidication of the room's ventilation quality.
  • Did you know?

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are commonly found in household chemicals, sanitizers and cleaning products.
  • Did you know?

    Formaldehyde (CH₂O) is commonly emitted by paints, fabrics, carpets, adhesives, and building materials.
  • Did you know?

    Particulate Matter (PM) is invisible to the naked eye, and can be a vehicle for viruses & bacteria.